Sharing Body Respect

Thanks for your support in getting information about Body Respect into the virtual world. Body Respect is written for diverse readership and we’ve crafted ways of describing the book that may appeal to different audiences. Consider using the below descriptions as you spread the word through your networks. Posts that are written in a personal voice tend to get more response, so please adapt as you see fit – or, write your own!

    Shares for Diverse Audiences:

For the general public, people struggling with weight concerns, health and weight loss blogs
For health care practitioners and people working in public health
For academics

For the general public, people struggling with weight concerns, health and weight loss blogs
Think for a moment about your attitudes toward your body: Do you want to lose weight? Do you believe that people who are thinner are more healthy, attractive, and self-disciplined? Do you think dieting is an effective health strategy? Do you judge yourself or others because of weight?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, you’re not alone. It’s much more common for people to feel bad about their bodies than to appreciate them—and to judge others by those standards as well. But people don’t have to be packaged in a small size to be valuable and attractive—or healthy for that matter. Saying that they do causes more harm than good, and judgments based on size tell us more about our own prejudice than someone else’s health or worth. And, as you may well have discovered for yourself, dieting doesn’t cure food preoccupation, rid us of self-criticism or ensure happiness.

It could be that, like so many people trying to make sense of failed diets, you’ve read every diet or nutrition text book going. Out of interest, how many of them described how stress and social factors influence metabolism, health, and weight? There is a plethora of findings spanning setpoint through to compassion and living with size stigma that is vital to understanding weight and yet gets never indexed in mainstream books – until now. Newly out, Body Respect: What Conventional Health Books Leave Out, Get Wrong, or Just Plain Fail to Understand about Weight is the insider’s guide not just to nutrition and our bodies, but to all that’s misunderstood about them.

Authors Bacon & Aphramor cover the latest science on size, weight, and diet in clear, lively language rigorously supported by data. Integrating a social justice agenda, Body Respect critiques weight science, explains the fall-out of a health agenda based on thinness as the goal, and offers an alternative path to compassionate and effective self-care and health care. Using peer-reviewed evidence, real life stories, and an ethical rationale, the authors debunk obesity myths and outline the key processes – in our bodies, the sciences, and society – affecting our diet and health as individuals and as a community.

Body insecurity is rampant, and it doesn’t have to be. It’s time to show every body respect. Let’s toss out the discredited beliefs and false assumptions that drive our culture’s shame and distress about weight. This book will be indispensable reading for everyone seeking a clearer, more hopeful alternative.

More information can be found on the book’s website: http://thebodypolitic.biz/bodyrespect. Be sure to check out the rave reviews it’s received by following the early endorsements link.

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For health care practitioners
Newly out, Body Respect, What Conventional Health Books Get Wrong, Leave Out, or Just Plain Fail to Understand about Weight (http://thebodypolitic.biz/bodyrespect/) is a short, inexpensive and highly accessible book that challenges mainstream assumptions about weight and supports health care practitioners counter body shame and weight stigmatization in their clinical practice.

Body Respect makes sense of failed dieting and provides the science and philosophy to support new ways of thinking about self-care – even when people are ambivalent about size acceptance. For practitioners keen to adopt a new public health ethic, one premised on the belief that health requires action on social justice within a framework bounded by compassion, this is the book you’ve been waiting for.

Co-authored by scientists, educators, and Health at Every Size® (HAES) experts Drs. Linda Bacon and Lucy Aphramor, the book draws on findings at the intersection of science and social theory to argue for politically aware therapeutic relationships that foster resilience and self-care, keeping practitioners relevant in an inequitable world and helping them to better understand how to use their expertise while nurturing their clients in finding their own expertise. It’s also intended to be a textbook supplement suitable for adoption across a broad range of disciplines, including nutrition and dietetics, fat studies, social theory, women’s studies, health journalism, and all areas of healthcare, wellness and fitness.

More information can be found on the book’s website: http://thebodypolitic.biz/bodyrespect. Be sure to check out the rave reviews it’s received by following the early endorsements link. As Jacqui Gingras writes, “For those who dare to pick up this book and engage with the evidence that is so clearly presented, the power to transform an entire body paradigm is in your hands.”


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For academics
Newly out, Body Respect, What Conventional Health Books Get Wrong, Leave Out, or Just Plain Fail to Understand about Weight (http://thebodypolitic.biz/bodyrespect/) is a short, inexpensive and highly accessible text that counters the body shaming and stigma consequent on an anti-obesity agenda and provides a model for critical thought. It’s aimed at anyone keen to teach or practice a new public health ethic, one premised on the belief that health requires action on social justice within a framework bounded by compassion. It helps readers make sense of body size and failed dieting and provides the science and philosophy to support them in adopting new ways of thinking about self-care – even when people are ambivalent about body acceptance.

Co-authored by scientists, educators, and Health at Every Size® (HAES) experts Linda Bacon and Lucy Aphramor, the book draws on findings at the intersection of science and social theory, unpicking the myths that sell thinness as a panacea and ignore the impact of poverty, oppression and stigma on health outcomes. It’s suitable for adoption across a broad range of disciplines, including all areas of healthcare, wellness and fitness, nutrition and dietetics, women’s studies, sociology, health journalism, and fat studies. As Dr. Jacqui Gingras writes, “For those who dare to pick up this book and engage with the evidence that is so clearly presented, the power to transform an entire body paradigm is in your hands.”

More information can be found on the book’s website: http://thebodypolitic.biz/bodyrespect/, including a link for academics considering it for course adoption to request a free review copy.

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